Funny dating sims

People drew fan art, and not just of her characters — but of her, based on her own sketched avatar.She engaged regularly with fans at first through journal updates on her Deviant Art and then through Tumblr posts.

Her real-life friends chimed in, helping her make podcasts (dubbed Pacthecasts) and manage the fan groups.

But while the Pacthesis games garnered a passionate following, this internet fame wasn’t something she initially aimed for.

Her Deviant Art profile’s comments are full of people asking for another game or wishing her well, whatever she may be up to.

Even on other social media, former fans reflect on their many late nights playing her games and the fun little interconnected world that they all existed in. Others talk about how Pacthesis introduced them to the dating sim genre — and to fandom in general.

(Amy was the name on her profile, though she never divulged more than that.) She kept her identity secret, which was understandable, considering she was a high school student at the height of her popularity.

Though many wanted to know more, she only revealed her face in drawings.

For many Deviant Art lurkers in the late 2000s and early 2010s, the name Pacthesis brings to mind a specific image: a yellow background with a grumpy-looking coffee cup, the logo of a particular Deviant Art dating sim maker.

And more than that, the name recalls a specific time in these young, female fans’ lives: when they discovered a world of games developed by, and made for, people just like them.

I guess I decided to give it a shot.” Inspired by creators like nummyz, another Deviant Art user who made Flash dating sims for girls in the late 2000s, Amy went about making her own project.

The first-ever Pacthesis game was shedding the male lead for a female character.

“I’m currently a web developer at a [loyalty] marketing firm,” Pacthesis — Amy — told Polygon in an email.

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