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261.] 1614.—"That knave Simon the Caffro, not what the writer took him for—he is a knave, and better lost than found."—Sainsbury, i. [1615.—"Odola and Gala are Capharrs which signifieth misbelievers."—Sir T. toy mesme qui passe pour vn Kiaffer, ou homme sans Dieu, parmi les Mausulmans."—De la Boullaye-le-Gouz, 310 (ed.

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After the interview the Governor-General announced as a new discovery, from the Amir's pronunciation, that Cābŭl was the correct form. word of woe and bitter shame; Where proud old England's flag, dishonoured, sank Beneath the Crescent; and the butcher knives Beat down like reeds the bayonets that had flashed From Plassey on to snow-capt Caucasus, In triumph through a hundred years of war." CACOULI, s. to the Journal d'Antoine Galland, at Constantinople in 1673: "Dragmes de Cacouli, drogue qu'on use dans le Cahue," i.e. kabīr, ṣaghīr], which is as much as to say greater cardamom and smaller cardamom."—Garcia De O., f.

Natives resident in these localities are easily recognisable elsewhere by the general hue of their dress. of laterite, or, as the Singhalese call it, cabook."—Tennent's Ceylon, i. It was told characteristically of the late Lord Ellenborough that, after his arrival in India, though for months he heard the name correctly spoken by his councillors and his staff, he persisted in calling it Căbōol till he met Dost Mahommed Khan. calling one of them cacollá quebir, and the other cacollá ceguer [Ar. stated that the Rani (of Bednore) would pay a yearly sum of 100,000 Hoons or Pagodas, besides a tribute of other valuable articles, such as Foful (betel), Dates, Sandal-wood, Kakul ...

From Dozy's remarks this would seem in Barbary to take the form ḳabāya. libās, 'clothing') ou Cabaye, est de toile de Cotton fort fine et blanche, qui leur va jusqu'aux talons."—Pyrard de Laval, i.

Whether from Arabic or from Portuguese, the word has been introduced into the Malay countries, and is in common use in Java for the light cotton surcoat worn by Europeans, both ladies and gentlemen, in dishabille.

1665.—"It will appear in the sequel of this History, that the pretence used by Aureng-Zebe, his third Brother, to cut off his (Dara's) head, was that he was turned Kafer, that is to say, an Infidel, of no Religion, an Idolater."—Bernier, E.

are presently upon their Punctilios with God Almighty, and interrogate him, Why he suffers him to go afoot and in Rags, and this Coffery (Unbeliever) to vaunt it thus? Mohun's Coffre Franck from the Protestant religion."—Ft.

The word is not now used in India Proper, unless by the Portuguese. 372), thinks that the word was introduced before the time of the Portuguese, and remarks that kabaya in Ceylon means a coat or jacket worn by a European or native.] c. 1554.—"And moreover there are given to these Kings (Malabar Rajas) when they come to receive these allowances, to each of them a cabaya of silk, or of scarlet, of 4 cubits, and a cap or two, and two sheath-knives."—S. 1572.— In these two passages Burton translates caftan. 1598.—"They wear sometimes when they go abroad a thinne cotton linnen gowne called Cabaia...."—Linschoten, 70; [Hak.

But it has become familiar in Dutch, from its use in Java. 1540.—"There was in her an Embassador who had brought Hidalcan [Idalcan] a very rich Cabaya ... he ordered him then to bestow a cabaya."—Castanheda, iv. 1585.—"The King is apparelled with a Cabie made like a shirt tied with strings on one side."—R.

and the ubiquity of the fine red dust which penetrates every crevice and imparts its own tint to every neglected article. We may remark that Ḳāḳula was a place somewhere on the Gulf of Siam, famous for its fine aloes-wood (see Ibn Batuta, iv. And a bastard kind of Cardamom appears to be exported from Siam, Amomum xanthoides, Wal. Avicena gives a chapter on the cacullá, dividing it into the bigger and the less ...

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